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How Dentists Lost Dentistry

October 16, 2013

Filed under: Business of Dentistry — Tags: , , , — Barry @ 1:12 PM

Friends having having a drink in a bar-784467

 

I recently attended the 2013 Pankey Alumni Meeting in Orlando Florida.  One night, while sitting around the bar with fellow alumni members, throwing back a few, I realized that after all these years our practices had evolved similarly.

All very different but quite similar.

I began to reminisce about the first time I went to the Pankey Institute.  It was the late eighties and I was at the lowest point in my dental career.  After fifteen years of practicing without a clue…I was ready to be saved.  What I learned was a way of doing dentistry that covered not only technical dentistry, but the business of dentistry and the behavioral components as well.

Dentistry is about way more than tools and techniques.  As a practicing dentist, an educator a coach and an owner of a dental laboratory, I find most dentists run into problems because they over-emphasize the technical component.

Meanwhile…back at the Alumni Meeting…one of Pankey’s elders, an original cadre member made a speech.  He said, “The Pankey philosophy is needed now more than ever.”

I disagree.  What is needed now more than ever is a philosophy…any philosophy, that teaches dentists a way to work their way through this incredibly complex field of technical dentistry, human behavior, business ethics, sales and marketing…in an ever changing world.

Honestly, I got lucky.  I could have continued to learn more and more fragmented technical courses without any sense of coherence.

Back then there weren’t many choices—today there are many institutions that offer a continuum of philosophical dentistry.  Many dentists have benefited from taking their programs.

But too many have not — and that is a problem.

Dental schools do not prepare dentists for the real world (an ever changing domain).  Today’s young dentists do not have the same opportunities that were available years ago.  Their student loans are higher and the cost of opening their own practices have skyrocketed. 

Between those obligations and an enormous amount to learn…they are looking for other options.

Dentists are doing more marketing than ever before.  Dentists are joining insurance plans in order to get new patients and fill their chairs.  Dentists are joining DSOs (dental service organizations-aka corporate dentistry).

Along the way dentists are losing their autonomy.  Some would argue that we always have our freedom of choice, and that is true, but to exercise it takes a lot more “philosophical training.”

Someone once told me that philosophy was a tough sell.  And I might agree…What?  Do we really need Aristotle?

But if Aristotle were alive in the nineteenth century he would have been William James—a psychologist, and if he were alive today he would be Anthony Robbins…a lifestyle coach.

After all he did train Alexander to become great.

The paradigm for how dentistry is delivered has changed.  There is no going back.

As the Affordable Care Act and DSO’s  become prominent, only those dentists who understand the complete concept of dentistry will survive with their autonomy.

And the philosophy teachers?  That role will be filled by government and corporate dentistry.  They will tell dentists how to practice.  They will take over all of the other domains that we used to call philosophy.  They will infuse the practice of dentistry with their mission…their vision and their purpose.

There are plenty of advantages of the old way of doing dentistry.  Everyone preserved their freedom of choice,  Dentists, as much as people would disagree, had to have the patient’s best interests at heart in order to survive…their goal was to help people keep their teeth rather than just watching numbers and bottom lines.

That’s how dentists have lost dentistry…by not paying attention to learning a “way” to practice. 

That is also how I came to sit at a bar with dentists who all practice very similarly…yet differently.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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10 Reasons Why My Patients Love Me

December 10, 2011

Filed under: Pankey — Tags: , , — Barry @ 11:18 PM
Does he hate the dentist?

Does he hate the dentist?

A few weeks ago a blog post ran wild on the Internet.  It was written by a young dentist who had recently left the field and wrote about 10 of her frustrations with patients.  The post went viral because there was a lot of truth in what she wrote.  Check out the post.

I laughed along with most patients and dentists.  For years we have been the brunt of comedians and the media who portray us as dullards who just inflict pain.  Some of the comments on the blog post were actually nasty.  There is no doubt that the image of dentists could use a facelift.  But what really interested me about the post was a comment I read on Frank Spear’s blog, by the author herself.

In the comment she claimed that she never really liked dentistry, and that was the reason why she left.  For that, I commend her courageous decision.  Later in the comment  she said she even took Pankey courses,  “which I loved, to try to help myself. In the end, it wasn’t enough.”

I will admit that having a successful career in any profession requires at least liking what you do.  I remember being thirty six years old and wanting to walk away from dentistry because of some of the same frustrations listed in the blog post.  Instead, maybe because I come from a different generation, I didn’t.  But I certainly can identify with the frustrations.

So many dentists try to cope with the issues by applying practice management principles…learning communication and language skills as well.  What I really feel helped me the most was developing a philosophy…no, more of a mindset, or if you can handle the word…an attitude toward life and work.  From that mindset, a culture developed, and I felt as if I had more control.  And when I stopped blaming the profession and patients…things changed.

I owe a lot of that change to the Pankey Institute and Dr. Peter Dawson.  I studied and applied the principles…the behavioral and philosophic ones were the ones that changed everything.  And today…my patients love me.

I know because they tell me.  Yep…they say it right out loud…to my face, to my staff, to their friends, online and offline.

Sure, there are those who don’t like me…but they are not in my practice anymore.

So here is my list of 10 reasons my patients love me: (more…)

The TAO – Introduction (1)

February 24, 2010

INTRODUCTION

“Success follows doing what you want to do. 
There is no other way to be successful.”

––Malcolm Forbes

In March 2002, I self-published my book, The Art of the Examination. Drawing on my 30 years of experience as a dentist, I told the story of how I developed my philosophy of practice, how important that foundation was to my everyday work, and how the initial patient examination could allow patients and staff to understand your values, share in them, and benefit from them.
Since the publication of that book, I have been asked by many dentists to provide them with a more information about the examination process.  They told me that the book should be required reading in every dental school.   The TAO of Dentistry is (more…)